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Who We Are

We provide support for African American filmmakers, film projects and film screenings that positively depict African American culture.

Reel Images Film & Video Group

Rodney Thompson – Project Director

“From the beginning what we set out to do is give voice to people who ordinarily wouldn’t get the opportunity to tell their stories in this medium and its gratifying to know we’ve been successful doing that.”

Our Mission

Support The Culture

The mission of the organization is to support film projects that promote African American culture.

Film Projects

We provide programs and activities such as film screenings, and assistance to filmmaking projects.

Organization

The Reel Images Film & Video Group, is a non-profit, tax-exempt, 501(c)(3), community
based organization established in April of 1992.

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Stinson McClendon – Project Director

“Reel Images gives voice to filmmakers who are not a part of mainstream media. The films they produce allow Americans to see alternative views of others thereby offering them an opportunity to see a more complete view of the American experience. “Film has the power to change the way we think about ourselves and our culture. Films have the capacity to influence people and lead them to new perspectives.”

UPCOMING RELEASE

I REMEMBER 12TH STREET

“I Remember 12th Street” is a documentary film produced by Rodney M. Thompson and Stinson McClendon about the history of Kansas City’s storied 12th Street, the subject of song and jazz legends, as told through first-hand accounts by people who lived through one of the most fascinating periods in the city’s history.

In Kansas City, Missouri, from the 1930s to the 1960s, 12th Street, from downtown going east for scores of blocks, was the center of life in a thriving African American community. The street was home to commerce and entertainment. This is the story of a street that sustained and shaped Kansas City’s African American community during a critical period. The community elders remember 12th Street.

The story of the fabled street is brought to life in this intriguing film that explores an important part of Kansas City’s history that must be preserved.

Join us on February 26 @ 6:30p on Zoom for the virtual film release. Directly followed by a Q&A with the directors Rodney Thompson & Stinson Mclendon from Reel Images and the documentary participants. Moderated by Dr. Carmaleta Williams, Executive Director of the Black Archives.

Free tickets are available on EventBrite.
For more Information email

“I REMEMBER 12TH STREET” Reel Images February 2021

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Production & Development

We believe in a diverse range of talent and personality brings creative skills and ideas to the web.

“I Remember 12th Street”

remembering12thstreet

a documentary film by Rodney Thompson and Stinson McClendon about the history of Kansas City’s storied 12th Street, the subject of song and jazz legends, as told through first hand accounts by people who lived through one of the most fascinating periods in the city’s history.

In Kansas City, Missouri, from the 1930’s to the 1960’s, 12th Street was the center of life in a thriving African American community. The street was home to commerce and entertainment. This is where legend was born. But, this is the story of a street, not just musically but as the place that sustained and shaped Kansas City’s African American community during its formative years.

“Bout It, a film by Stinson McClendon”

BOUTITFLYER

is a documentary film by Stinson McClendon that compares the commitment of contemporary artist to use their art forms for social change as artist did in the 1960’s.  “Bout It” draws it’s name from a popular phrase used in the black urban community to indicate whether a person was up for some task or challenge. It could be said that the young of the 1960’s where up to the challenge of confronting racism and segregation on a national level.  They were “Bout It.” The question arises, are today’s artist are using their art forms for changing the social and economic problems of trouble-plagued communities? Can they use the their art to move the youth of today to become critical thinkers and change agents in their communities?

“Reconciling With The Elders”

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a documentary film by Rodney Thompson and Stinson McClendon, examines the fragile relationship that exists between the youngest of African American men and older generations of African American men. The nature of this relationship is a key factor in determining whether young African American men will realize their full potential as men. The need for mentors is overwhelming. The film confronts the often, hostile attitudes the two groups harbor toward each other, while seeking to illuminate the reasons for this disregard for each other that impacts the collective well being of the African American community.

“Room With An Ear, by Stinson McClendon”

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It’s the holiday season, silver bells and office parties. Randy and Carmen are settling into their dream home located in one of the affluent neighborhoods in town. Life is good. But mistrust, roaming eyes and a room with an ear threaten to bring an unhappy beginning to the new year.

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Our Films

Spotlight Film: "A Room with an Ear", It’s the holiday season, silver bells and office parties. Randy and Carmen are settling into their dream home located in one of the affluent neighborhoods in town. Life is good. But mistrust, roaming eyes and a room with an ear threaten to bring an unhappy beginning to the new year.

FILM PRODUCTION

Interested in getting your story told? Contact us!